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Interdisciplinary Studies Program  

Asian Studies (ASIA)

 

Minor in Asian Studies

The Asian Studies Minor at the University of North Carolina Asheville offers students the opportunity to take interdisciplinary courses which have a substantial Asian focus and/or content. Students must complete at least 18 hours for the minor from the list of courses below. The courses must be chosen from at least three disciplines, with at least 6 hours at the 300-level or above. Appropriate courses may be substituted with the approval of the director of the Asian Studies Minor. Students must earn a minimum 2.00 grade-point- average on all minor courses taken at UNC Asheville. One-half of the hours required for a minor must be completed at UNC Asheville, to include at least 6 semester hours of 300-400 level courses.


Courses in Asian Studies Minor:
(Choose six courses from at least three disciplines from the list below)

  • ASIA 100 Introduction to Asian Studies
  • ASIA 101 Elementary Chinese I
  • ASIA 102 Elementary Chinese II
  • ASIA 201 Intermediate Chinese I
  • ASIA 202 Intermediate Chinese II
  • ASIA 301 Advanced Chinese I
  • ASIA 302 Advanced Chinese II
  • ASIA 303 Chinese Literature: Great Works
  • ASIA 304 Chinese Cinema
  • ASIA 373 East Asian Literature in Translation Pre-1900
  • ASIA 373 Taekwon-Do: Practice, History, and Culture
  • ASIA 499 Undergraduate Research in Asian Studies
  • HIST 380 Imperial China
  • HIST 381 Revolutionary China
  • HIST 383 Women in China
  • HIST 384 History of Japan
  • HIST 388 (RELS 388) Introduction to Islam
  • LIT 349 Studies in Contemporary Literature: Introduction to Postcolonial Literature
  • PHIL 313: Oriental Philosophy
  • PHIL 352 Contemporary Philosophy: Gandhi & King: Peace & Non-Violence
  • POLS 366 Democracy in Asia
  • POLS 369: Governments & Politics of Southeast Asia
  • POLS 380 Globalization & Its Critics
  • RELS 280 Asian Religious Traditions 
  • RELS 373 Religion and Business in Asia
  • RELS 373 Sacred Texts of the World
  • RELS 381 Religions of South Asia
  • RELS 386 Buddhism


Full Listing of Courses in the Asian Studies Minor

ASIA 100 Introduction to Asian Studies (4)

An introductory interdisciplinary survey of the discipline of Asian Studies. Students will gain an understanding of Asian Studies through insights from history, philosophy, politics, religious studies, literature, and culture. It will review regions and nations in contemporary Asia. Some of the themes covered in this course include the complex relationships between the individual, the family, and the state; the political, social, cultural, and economic history of selected countries in Asia; cultural nationalism; and an examination of the dynamics of popular culture in Asia in this age of globallization through media and cultural studies.
See department chair. 

ASIA 101 Elementary Chinese I (4)

Intended for students with no prior knowledge of the Mandarin language, this course introduces the fundamental structures of Chinese, with emphases on the spoken language, oral communications, pronunciation, grammatical analysis, and introductory reading and writing of Chinese characters. Students will learn to read Chinese with pinyin, acquire basic social communication skills through writing and speaking, and gain basic knowledge of Chinese culture and society.
This course will include individual tutorials with the instructor and a language lab.  See department chair.

ASIA 102 Elementary Chinese II (4)

Students will further develop their speaking and writing skills, and focus on conversation, character writing, and comprehension, with increasing emphasis on vocabulary building and grammar. Students will continue to build knowledge of Chinese culture and society. This course will include individual tutorials with the instructor and a language lab.
Prerequisite: ASIA 101 or permission of instructor. See department chair.

ASIA 201 Intermediate Chinese I (4)

An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and expand both reading and writing vocabulary. Students will also start practicing composition. This course will continue to build student knowledge of Chinese culture and society. This course includes individual tutorials with the instructor and a language lab.
Prerequisites: ASIA 102 or permission of instructor. See department chair.

ASIA 202 Intermediate Chinese II (4)

Further intermediate-level work on skills in conversation, comprehension, and grammar. Continued practice in composition. Students develop basic proficiency in Chinese and familiarity with Chinese culture by practicing the use of basic language skills and acquisition of vocabulary. This course will include individual tutorials with the instructor and a langauge lab.
Prerequisite: ASIA 201 or permission of instructor. See department chair. 

ASIA 301 Advanced Chinese I (4)

Advanced study in speaking, listening, reading, and writing of Chinese through the use of audiovisual materials, oral presentations, and skits. Student writing assignments will be geared toward assimilating more sophisticated grammatical structures. This course will introduce students to a wide variety of written forms and styles. Students will be expected to become fluent in both writing and speaking of the language, allowing them to examine in depth Chinese culture and society. This course will include individual tutorials with the instructor and a language lab.
Prerequisite: ASIA 202 or permission of instructor. See department chair. 

ASIA 302 Advanced Chinese II (4)

Further consolidates speaking, listening, reading, and writing of Chinese through diversified discussion topics and longer, more frequent writing assignments. Students become fluent in written and spoken Chinese. Students will use their knowledge of the Chinese language to conduct in-depth examinations of Chinese culture and society. This course will include individual tutorials with the instructor and a language lab.
Prerequisite: ASIA 301 or permission of instructor. See department chair.

ASIA 303 Chinese Literature: Great Works (4)

A survey of great Chinese literary works, written in or translated into English. Students will read representative poetry, plays, fiction, and prose writings in different historical periods, and become familiar with China's cultural traditions and literary history as they deepen their understanding of Chinese society past and present. Readings are arranged in chronological order from the ancient to the contemporary, with China broadly defined to include Hong Kong, and Taiwan. 
No prior knowledge of East Asian literature or languages is required. See department chair.

ASIA 304: Chinese Cinema (4)

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of Chinese cinema, broadly defined to include films from mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and other Chinese-language cinemas. Filma are structured around different themes such as national and transnational, Chinese auteur directors, Hong Kong and the commercial cinema, and challenges of the sixth generation. Students will examine the specific political landscape of Chinese society over the last century, and enrich their understanding of Chinese history, culture, and popular media. No knowledge of Chinese language is required. All films screened for the course will have English subtitles.
See department chair.  

ASIA 373-001 East Asian Literature in Translation: Pre-1900

This course is an introduction to canonical East Asian literature in translation before 1900 with the primary focus on China and Japan. Students will read important literary works, organized by several important themes, topics, and authors.
No prior knowledge of East Asian literature or languages is required to enroll in this course.

ASIA 373-002 Taekwon-Do: Practice, History, and Culture (3)

This course is designed for beginner through advanced students interested in the Korean martial art of Taekwon-Do. Studies will include actual "hands-on" practice of the traditional Chang Hun style of Taekwon-Do. Students will learn kicking, boxing, and striking, Ho Sin Sul (self-defense techniques) and the performance of traditional Hyungs (stylized movement patterns inspired by mythical events and figures from Korean history). This course will include classroom study of Taekwon-Do within its historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts. Topics will include the evolution of the Korean martial arts from the 6th century A.D. through Korea's liberation from Japan in the 20th century. Students will be introduced to Zen practices in Asian martial arts, as well as the cultural components of Korean society including Korean shamanism, Confucianism, and the fine arts.     

ASIA 499 Undergraduate Research in Asian Studies (1-6)

Independent research under the supervision of a faculty member. An IP grade may be awarded at the discretion of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. 
See Director of Asian Studies Minor.

HIST 380 Imperial China (3)

History of China from Neolithic times to Ming Dynasty (1368–1644).

HIST 381 Revolutionary China (3)

A treatment of Chinese history from the Qing Dynasty (1644–1912) to the present, including the demise of the imperial system, the Nationalist period, Communist China and post-Deng reforms.

HIST 383 Women in China (3)

An introduction to gender, family and social organization in Chinese history. The reading of autobiographies and memoirs will be combined with historical analyses that provide context for women’s experiences. Particular attention is given to women in the Qing Dynasty and the 20th century.

HIST 384 History of Japan (3)

A survey of Japanese history from legendary times to the present. In addition to political and institutional history, it examines the complex cultural responses toward foreigners and militarism. Particular attention is given to Japan’s astonishing modernization during the Meiji period.

HIST 388 (RELS 388) Introduction to Islam (3)

Explores Islam as a faith and way of life. In addition to studying the Quran and Prophetic traditions, it will closely examine the dynamics of Islamic law and its role in everyday life in addition to Muslim ritual and devotional practices.

LIT 349 Studies in Contemporary Literature: Intro to Postcolonial Literature

New forms of poetry and fiction by current authors. Emphasis on imaginative qualities as well as critical analysis.
Prerequisite: LIT 323; or permission of instructor.

PHIL 313 Oriental Philosophy (3)

A survey of the main philosophies/religions of the Orient: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism. Their content, context and relevance to Western thought.

PHIL 352 Contemporary Philosophy: Gandhi & King: Peace & Non-Violence

A major tradition of 20th-century philosophy, e.g. American pragmatism, Phenomenology, linguistic analysis, hermeneutics, contemporary ethics, philosophy of science, or con-temporary political philosophy.
Prerequisite: Two (2) courses in philosophy or permission of instructor. May be repeated as subject matter changes.

POLS 366 Democracy in Asia (4)

Examines the Western concept of liberal democratic government and the political and cultural challenges of transplanting it to nations such as India, China, Japan and the countries of Southeast Asia.

POLS 369 Government and Politics of Southeast Asia (4)

Examines contemporary political, cultural and economic developments, processes and institutions in various Southeast Asian nations including Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore.

POLS 380 Globalization & Its Critics (4)

Examines the political, economic and cultural dimensions of globalization and its historic antecedents. Emphasis is placed on how globalization is experienced and interpreted by non-Western cultures and their responses to globalizations challenges.

RELS 280 Asian Religious Traditions (3)

A comparative examination of the development of the religious traditions that originated in South and East Asia, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism.

RELS373 ST:Sacred Texts of the World

How can we deal with a shrinking planet on which widely different cultural and religious traditions converge at an ever-increasing rate, often with disastrous consequences? Are the world's religious traditions bound to clash? This course proposes that an understanding of the sacred texts of world religions offers a key to peaceful diversity. Religious texts often provide the most effective ways for outsiders to understand the basics of the tradition and the culture of their faithful. Here, we survey the sacred texts of the world. Lectures explore the texts of Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, East Asian religions, Islam, Zoroastrianism, Jainism, and the texts of more recent religious movements from Mormonism to Sikhism, and Bahai. Despite their many similarities, these writings also exhibit tremendous variety in how they came into existence, how they were canonized, and how they are used in their respective faiths. These are texts that many people live by, and are sometimes willing to die for.

RELS 381 Religions of South Asia (3)

A study of the history, beliefs and practices of the major indigenous religions of south Asia (Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Buddhism) as well as their development in relation to imported traditions such as Islam and Christianity.


RELS 386 Buddhism (3)

A study of the life of the Buddha and his teachings as they influenced and transformed the cultures of South and Southeast Asia, China, Japan and the modern West. Topics include meditation, the participation of women, "socially engaged Buddhism" and Buddhist views on ecology, war, and human rights.


179, 379, 479 Liberal Studies Colloquia (LS 179, 379, 479) (3)

Colloquia offered to fulfill ILS requirement. See Liberal Studies for course descriptions. May not be used to fulfill minor requirements.

Last edited by rldavid@unca.edu on October 5, 2013