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Interdisciplinary Studies Program  

Legal Studies (LEGL)

Minor in Legal Studies

The Legal Studies minor helps students to understand the nature of law and its role and functions from different disciplinary perspectives. Students must complete 18 hours from the list of courses below. (Note: prerequisites for these courses may increase the total number of hours.) Courses must be selected from at least three different disciplines and no more than 9 hours can come from any one discipline. Appropriate special topics courses may be substituted with the approval of the director of Legal Studies. Students should understand that the minor is not intended as a pre-law program or as a preparation for law school. Students must earn a minimum 2.00 grade-point-average on all minor courses taken at UNC Asheville. One-half of the hours required for a minor must be completed at UNC Asheville, to include at least 6 semester hours of 300-400 level courses. 

The courses must be distributed as follows: 

At least 6 hours from the following list which explore the nature of law in society.

  • PHIL 305 Philosophy of Law (3)
  • POLS 235 Introduction to Law (3)
  • SOC 480 Sociology of Law (3) 

At least 3 hours from the following list which examine the nature of case law.

  • MGMT 341 Commercial Law (3)
  • POLS 327 Constitutional Law (3)
  • POLS 330 Individual Rights and Civil Liberties (3)

At least 6 hours from the following list which either explore the role of law in different policy areas, develop analytical skills important in legal thinking, or provide a wider context for understanding law and legal issues.

  • DRAM 102 Public Speaking (3)
  • ECON 316 Transaction Cost Economics (3)
  • HIST 303 Colonial North America (3)
  • HIST 340 Classical Greece (3)
  • HIST 342 The Roman Empire (3)
  • MCOM 490 Mass Communication Law and Ethics (3)
  • MGMT 300 Legal and Ethical Environment (3)
  • PHIL 101 Introduction to Logic (3)
  • PHIL 200 Introduction to Ethical Theory (3)
  • PHIL 214 Philosophy of Human Rights (3)
  • POLS 387 International Organizations (4)
  • POLS 388 Human Rights and International Politics (3)
  • SOC 200 Introduction to Criminology (3)
  • SOC 340 Social Control and Deviant Behavior (3) 

Courses in Legal Studies

 

PHIL 305 Philsophy of Law (3)

Differing interpretations of the nature of law and justice, rationales for punishment, concepts of responsibility and causation in the law. Readings from both philosophical and legal sources. Spring.

POLS 235 Introduction to Law (3)

An introduction to the American legal system. Readings and discussions center on representative legal opinions in a various areas including constitutional, criminal, contract, and property law, materials examining how cases are brought to court and the factors that shape judicial decisions. See department chair.

POLS 480 Sociology of Law (3)

Problematizes the law as a social institution, revealing how its meaning and content are as changeable as the political, social and economic forces of society. A central theme of the course is the complex and reciprocal relationship between law and social change. Special attention is given to law in theory and practice relative to cultural values, conflicting interests, cultural resistance, status and power, and popular will. Even years Spring.

POLS 327 Constitutional Law (3)

Major issues of contemporary constitutional law using case studies with an overview of context for these issues; the role of the Supreme Court. Recommended prerequisite: POLS 220. See department chair.

 POLS 330 Individual Rights and Civil Liberties (3)

Examines judicial decisions regarding the relation between the individual and the state. The course covers cases involving individual rights and First Amendment freedoms. See department chair.

 MGMT 341 Commercial Law (3)

Overview of the commercial legal environment in which business enterprises operate. Examines the law relating to contracts, sales, security interests, commercial paper, warranties, debtor rights, creditor rights and fiduciary responsibilities. Prerequisites: ACCT 215. Spring.

DRAM 102 Public Speaking (3)

A study of the purpose, organization, development and delivery of the various forms of public address. (Students who have taken Speech 102 may not take this course for credit.) Fall and Spring.

ECON 316 Seminar in Transaction Cost Economics (3)

An examination of the role played by transaction costs in the design and evolution of human institutions. Applications drawn from economics, environmental science, management, political science, and sociology show that many aspects of economic, political and social institutions can be understood as outcomes of transaction cost economizing. Relies heavily on readings from original sources. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or 102. Spring.

HIST 303 Colonial North America (3)

Examines early North America from before European/American Indian contact to 1863. The course pays particular attention to the interaction of indigenous, European, and African peoples and cultures, to the competition for empire among English/ British, Spanish, and French nations and the rise of the British to a position of dominance in North America, and the internal development of American colonial society. See department chair.

HIST 340 Classical Greece (3)

A history of Greece from the Mycenaean Period to the death of Phillip II of Macedon in 336 B.C. See department chair.

HIST 342 The Roman Empire (3)

A study of Italy and the ecumenical world from the establishment of the Principate of Augustus to the abdication of Diocletian in 305 A.D. See department chair.

MCOM 490 Mass Communication Law and Ethics (3) 

A study of the legal sanctions and constitutional freedoms affecting the print and broadcasting media. An inquiry into the responsibilities of the media and discussion of specific ethical problems. Prerequisite: MCOM 104. Fall.

MGMT 300 Legal and Ethical Environment (3)

Emphasizes the role of ethics, the law, and their relationship in the business environment. Topics include structure of the court system, social responsibility and business, white- collar crime, employment relationships and discrimination, agency, alternative dispute resolution, securities and antitrust, and consumer protection. Critical thinking exercises utilize casework and library and electronic research. Fall and Spring.

PHIL 101 Introduction to Logic (3)

Logic and language, ambiguity, fallacies, the logic of propositions and of classes, elementary symbolic logic. Fall and Spring.

PHIL 200 Introduction to Ethical Theory (3)

An introduction to theories in ethics with a historical focus. Students will be introduced to virtue theory, utilitarianism, and deontology as well as some contemporary accounts of the sources of human values. Spring.

PHIL 214 Philosophy of Human Rights (3)

An analytical introduction to the concept of human rights. Readings will be drawn from both historical and contemporary philosophical sources. Fall.

POLS 387 International Organizations (4)

Examines the evolving goals and methods and strengths and weaknesses of some of the most influential international organizations. Special emphasis is placed on the United Nations system. Prerequisite: POLS 281; or permission of instructor. Even years Fall.

POLS 388 Human Rights and International Politics (3)

Examines the political, social and legal dimensions of the modern human rights movement and its implications for international affairs and United States foreign policy. Analyzes contemporary debates on various issues including the hierarchy of rights, conflicts between individual rights and societal priorities, refugees, international migration, asylum, repatriation, and the challenges created by transition to democracy. Even years Spring.

SOC 200 Introduction to Criminology (3)

Provides an introduction to the field of criminology, surveying the social construction of crime, the legal conceptualization of crime, the nature and extent of crime, the theoretical models on the causes of crime, typologies of crime, and the criminal justice response from policing, to trial, to institutionalization. Substantive attention is devoted to the importance of race, gender and social class in the American criminal justice system and the reliance on prisons as the solution to the crime problem. Spring.

SOC 340 Social Control and Deviant Behavior (3)

Provides an introduction to the field of criminology, surveying the social construction of crime, the legal conceptualization of crime, the nature and extent of crime, the theoretical models on the causes of crime, typologies of crime, and the criminal justice response from policing, to trial, to institutionalization. Substantive attention is devoted to the importance of race, gender and social class in the American criminal justice system and the reliance on prisons as the solution to the crime problem. Spring.

171-3, 271-3, 371-3, 471-3 Special Topics in Legal Studies (1-3)

Courses not otherwise included in the catalog but for which there may be special needs.  May be repeated for credit as subject matter changes. See program director.

179, 379, 479 Liberal Studies Colloquia (LS 179, 379, 479)

Colloquia offered to fulfill ILS requirements. See Liberal Studies for course descriptions. May not be used to fulfill major or minor requirements

Last edited by webmaster@unca.edu on April 19, 2011